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1  DOUGHTY Julius H. (I35562)
 
2  MERRILL Nathaniel (I3108)
 
3  NOYES Sidney Otis (I76859)
 
4  JOHNSON Sarah (I63287)
 
5  NOYES Ralph Will (I28024)
 
6  NOYES Sanford (I18624)
 
7  NOYES Frederick A. (I10050)
 
8  MERRILL Nathaniel (I4103)
 
9 The Will of Willamin Moore


In the name of god Amen the thirtieth daye of August in the year of our Lorde James by the grace of god now kinge of Englande I willamin Moore of the parish of all Saints in maldon in the county of Essex Wyddow being now very weaken bodye by reason of my great age and years whereby I am put in remembrance that my time and end approacheth and cometh on a pace, do therefore make publishe and declare this my last will and testament in writing in manner and forme following: First I commend my Soule into the hands of almighty god the Father the sonne and the holy ghost assuredly believing that all my Sinnes of gods great mercy in Jesus christ are doomed and done away And my bodie I comytt to christian buryall at the discretion of the executor of this my last will and testament here under named

Item I will and give unto my sonne nicholas Moore my tenement with the appertances situated and being in or near agenst Fulbridge street in the parish of Saint Peter in maldon aforesaid now in the tenure and occupation of [?] hybberd wyddow or her assigns to have and hold the said tenement with appertances unto the said nicholas his heirs and assigns forever.

Item I give and bequeath unto the said nicholas a hall bedstead standing in the chamber over the hall of the messauge in which I now dwell and a downe bed now being thereon and other the bedding and furniture thereunto belonging in all things fully furnished and a ...chest in the same chamber with all the linen in the same chest And it is in my minde and will that if in future the said nicholas (after my death) to marrye or to settle and occupe (by himself) the trade of a shoemaker that then the executor of this my testament shall immediately thereupon pay and deliver to him the said nicholas (as my gift) 10£ of lawful money of england.

Item I give and bequeath unto Sara Moore the daughter of my sonne Enoch Moore 5£ of lawful english money to be payd her by my executor at her age of 21 years or day of marriage which shall first happen

Then I will and give to be paid by my executor uppon my buryall unto my sonnes Samuel Enoch and Thomas Moore and to my daughters Anne and Phillip to everyone of the same my children (in token of a friendly remembrance) 5s. a piece and no more for that my said daughters and ye one of my said sonnes last named have had already their full portions

All the rest of my goods moveable household stuff and implements of household and whatsoever ellse I have or may dispose of that is testamentary I give fully and wholly unto Edward Moore my Sonne whome I do make constitute and ordain sole and only executor of this my last will and testament and him do appoint and require to pay my funerall and debts and the legacies of this my testament In witness whereof I have hereunto put my Seale subscribed my name the day and year first above written
the mark of
Willamin Moore widdow
In the prive of George Purcas [?]
Thomas Chesse the writer hereof


Note: Willamin's will was executed 30 Aug 1603 and proved in 1606.

Source: New England Historical Genealogical Register in the article "Sara, First Wife of Edmund Greenleaf (1588-1663)" by Dorothy Greenleaf Boynton [NEHGR 122:28-36]. 
Willamina (I13719)
 
10 The Will of Willamin Moore


In the name of god Amen the thirtieth daye of August in the year of our Lorde James by the grace of god now kinge of Englande I willamin Moore of the parish of all Saints in maldon in the county of Essex Wyddow being now very weaken bodye by reason of my great age and years whereby I am put in remembrance that my time and end approacheth and cometh on a pace, do therefore make publishe and declare this my last will and testament in writing in manner and forme following: First I commend my Soule into the hands of almighty god the Father the sonne and the holy ghost assuredly believing that all my Sinnes of gods great mercy in Jesus christ are doomed and done away And my bodie I comytt to christian buryall at the discretion of the executor of this my last will and testament here under named

Item I will and give unto my sonne nicholas Moore my tenement with the appertances situated and being in or near agenst Fulbridge street in the parish of Saint Peter in maldon aforesaid now in the tenure and occupation of [?] hybberd wyddow or her assigns to have and hold the said tenement with appertances unto the said nicholas his heirs and assigns forever.

Item I give and bequeath unto the said nicholas a hall bedstead standing in the chamber over the hall of the messauge in which I now dwell and a downe bed now being thereon and other the bedding and furniture thereunto belonging in all things fully furnished and a ...chest in the same chamber with all the linen in the same chest And it is in my minde and will that if in future the said nicholas (after my death) to marrye or to settle and occupe (by himself) the trade of a shoemaker that then the executor of this my testament shall immediately thereupon pay and deliver to him the said nicholas (as my gift) 10£ of lawful money of england.

Item I give and bequeath unto Sara Moore the daughter of my sonne Enoch Moore 5£ of lawful english money to be payd her by my executor at her age of 21 years or day of marriage which shall first happen

Then I will and give to be paid by my executor uppon my buryall unto my sonnes Samuel Enoch and Thomas Moore and to my daughters Anne and Phillip to everyone of the same my children (in token of a friendly remembrance) 5s. a piece and no more for that my said daughters and ye one of my said sonnes last named have had already their full portions

All the rest of my goods moveable household stuff and implements of household and whatsoever ellse I have or may dispose of that is testamentary I give fully and wholly unto Edward Moore my Sonne whome I do make constitute and ordain sole and only executor of this my last will and testament and him do appoint and require to pay my funerall and debts and the legacies of this my testament In witness whereof I have hereunto put my Seale subscribed my name the day and year first above written
the mark of
Willamin Moore widdow
In the prive of George Purcas [?]
Thomas Chesse the writer hereof


Note: Willamin's will was executed 30 Aug 1603 and proved in 1606.

Source: New England Historical Genealogical Register in the article "Sara, First Wife of Edmund Greenleaf (1588-1663)" by Dorothy Greenleaf Boynton [NEHGR 122:28-36]. 
Willamina (I13719)
 
11 The Will of Nicholas Moore Sr.

In the name of god amen Anno 1590 the 18th daye of August in the
32nd yere of the Reigne of Soverigne Lady Elizabeth by the grace of
god of England France and Ireland Queene Defender of the Faith I
Nicholas Moore of Maldon in the County of Essex and...diocesse Sick of
body but of sound and perfect memory god be thanked doe ordayne and
make this my...last will and testament in manner and forme folowinge
First I bequeath my soule into the hands of almight god my creator
and Redeemer and my body to the earth in sure hope of Resurrection
with the Just through my Lord and Savior Christ Jesus
Item I give and bequeath unto Willamin my wife my notage [?] or
tenament situated in Maldon aforesaid in the street called fulbridge
street now in the tenure and occupation of Thomas Moore my son and
his assignes, to have and to hold the same to her and her heirs forever


Item I give and bequeath unto her my said wife my lease and tenure of


...that I have in the house that I now dwell in To have and to hold the


same unto her and her assignes payinge the rent and discharging the
covenante in the same lease specified.
Lastly I give and bequeath unto the said Willamin my wife all and
singular my other moveables good debts Stock of leather...Tallow oile
and all other my chattles and Implements of household in hand I make
and ordain my sole executrix revokinge all...wills whatsoever In
witness whereof I have to this...set my hand and seale the Daye and
Year above written
Signum hefi [i.e. the mark of]
Nicholas Moore
In the...of Enoch Moore
Nicholas Moore the Younger Et
mei Samueila Moore Script


This will of Nicholas Moore Sr. was written by his son Samuel as
clerk, 18 Aug 1590, and was proved in Chelmsford, 22 Oct 1594, by
Samuel as attorney for his mother Willamin. Enoch Moore and Nicholas
Moore the Younger served as witnesses.


Source: New England Historical Genealogical Register in the article
"Sara, First Wife of Edmund Greenleaf (1588-1663)" by Dorothy Greenleaf


Boynton. [NEHGR 122:28-36] 
MOORE Nicholas, Sr. (I13718)
 
12 The Will of Nicholas Moore Sr.

In the name of god amen Anno 1590 the 18th daye of August in the
32nd yere of the Reigne of Soverigne Lady Elizabeth by the grace of
god of England France and Ireland Queene Defender of the Faith I
Nicholas Moore of Maldon in the County of Essex and...diocesse Sick of
body but of sound and perfect memory god be thanked doe ordayne and
make this my...last will and testament in manner and forme folowinge
First I bequeath my soule into the hands of almight god my creator
and Redeemer and my body to the earth in sure hope of Resurrection
with the Just through my Lord and Savior Christ Jesus
Item I give and bequeath unto Willamin my wife my notage [?] or
tenament situated in Maldon aforesaid in the street called fulbridge
street now in the tenure and occupation of Thomas Moore my son and
his assignes, to have and to hold the same to her and her heirs forever
Item I give and bequeath unto her my said wife my lease and tenure of
...that I have in the house that I now dwell in To have and to hold the
same unto her and her assignes payinge the rent and discharging the
covenante in the same lease specified.
Lastly I give and bequeath unto the said Willamin my wife all and
singular my other moveables good debts Stock of leather...Tallow oile
and all other my chattles and Implements of household in hand I make
and ordain my sole executrix revokinge all...wills whatsoever In
witness whereof I have to this...set my hand and seale the Daye and
Year above written
Signum hefi [i.e. the mark of]
Nicholas Moore
In the...of Enoch Moore
Nicholas Moore the Younger Et
mei Samueila Moore Script


This will of Nicholas Moore Sr. was written by his son Samuel as
clerk, 18 Aug 1590, and was proved in Chelmsford, 22 Oct 1594, by
Samuel as attorney for his mother Willamin. Enoch Moore and Nicholas
Moore the Younger served as witnesses.


Source: New England Historical Genealogical Register in the article
"Sara, First Wife of Edmund Greenleaf (1588-1663)" by Dorothy Greenleaf
Boynton. [NEHGR 122:28-36] 
MOORE Nicholas, Sr. (I13718)
 
13 Amos Oscar was Amos F. Noyes' eldest son and father of Shavey. Lapham (1886) described Amos Oscar Noyes "as well and favorably known as any man in town." However, Shavey and the family were probably emotionally neglected by A. Oscar Noyes as he was always attending to his business and was always "busy". His attention to town affairs, including social organizations undoubtedly left him little "quality" time to spend with his family.
A. Oscar founded an apothecary business in Norway in 1855. The Maine Register [Maine State Year-Book and Legislative Manual] for 1873-1874 shows A. Oscar Noyes was one of two constables and his book and stationary business was listed separately from his apothecary business. As early as 1861, A. Oscar was secretary of the Masonic Fraternal Order in Norway and held various positions every year following, except for 1864-1865, and was Grand Master in 1874 and 1875. From 1868 until about 1885, the Masons held their meetings in the rooms above Noyes Drug Store on the Mondays "on or before full moon". A. Oscar was a petitioner and charter member of the Royal Arch Masons of Poland (Mechanic Falls) in 1872-1873, although he was not subsequently an officer of that chapter (Lapham, 1886). Evidently, A. Oscar moved his apothecary and book business, in 1875, into the building formerly occupied by Isaac A. Denison (Lapham, 1886).
A. Oscar was a charter member of the Norway chapter (Pennesseewassee Lodge) of the Knights of Pythias (instituted 1878) and held the offices of Master of Exchequer (Treasurer) and Keeper of Records and Seals (Secretary). A. Oscar Noyes was Norway tax collector and constable 1861-1863 and town treasurer from 1874-1878 (Lapham, 1886).
Interestingly, A. Oscar joined the Temperance Watchmen after his father had. "The avowed object was 'to discourage the manufacture, sale, and use of alcoholic beverages.'(Lapham, 1886). The irony lies in the fact that the most common diluent in the patent medicines he sold was alcohol with many potions then available having an alcohol content equal to that of pure whiskey and few with an alcohol content below that of a mixed bar room drink! Upon A. Oscar's death, Anna continued the business. In 1886, Lapham reported: "Her capital stock is ten thousand dollars, and her annual sales amount to fifty thousand." Based on the economics of the times, the apothecary and stationary business was eminently successful.
While it may be argued that the success of a small business operating in a small town depended upon one's public relations, A. Oscar did not seem to have any time left to share with his family. Positions such as tax collector, constable, and town treasurer would have demanded a great deal of time, although they certainly were not full time vocations. Participation in fraternal organizations, committees, and boards of directors need not divide up one's time significantly, however, the combination of all of A. Oscar's activities, in addition to his running a thriving business must have meant he was worn thin at the end of each day. 
NOYES Amos Oscar (I16377)
 
14 Amos Oscar was Amos F. Noyes' eldest son and father of Shavey. Lapham (1886) described Amos Oscar Noyes "as well and favorably known as any man in town." However, Shavey and the family were probably emotionally neglected by A. Oscar Noyes as he was always attending to his business and was always "busy". His attention to town affairs, including social organizations undoubtedly left him little "quality" time to spend with his family.

A. Oscar founded an apothecary business in Norway in 1855. The Maine Register [Maine State Year-Book and Legislative Manual] for 1873-1874 shows A. Oscar Noyes was one of two constables and his book and stationary business was listed separately from his apothecary business. As early as 1861, A. Oscar was secretary of the Masonic Fraternal Order in Norway and held various positions every year following, except for 1864-1865, and was Grand Master in 1874 and 1875. From 1868 until about 1885, the Masons held their meetings in the rooms above Noyes Drug Store on the Mondays "on or before full moon". A. Oscar was a petitioner and charter member of the Royal Arch Masons of Poland (Mechanic Falls) in 1872-1873, although he was not subsequently an officer of that chapter (Lapham, 1886). Evidently, A. Oscar moved his apothecary and book business, in 1875, into the building formerly occupied by Isaac A. Denison (Lapham, 1886).

A. Oscar was a charter member of the Norway chapter (Pennesseewassee Lodge) of the Knights of Pythias (instituted 1878) and held the offices of Master of Exchequer (Treasurer) and Keeper of Records and Seals (Secretary). A. Oscar Noyes was Norway tax collector and constable 1861-1863 and town treasurer from 1874-1878 (Lapham, 1886).

Interestingly, A. Oscar joined the Temperance Watchmen after his father had. "The avowed object was 'to discourage the manufacture, sale, and use of alcoholic beverages.'(Lapham, 1886). The irony lies in the fact that the most common diluent in the patent medicines he sold was alcohol with many potions then available having an alcohol content equal to that of pure whiskey and few with an alcohol content below that of a mixed bar room drink! Upon A. Oscar's death, Anna continued the business. In 1886, Lapham reported: "Her capital stock is ten thousand dollars, and her annual sales amount to fifty thousand." Based on the economics of the times, the apothecary and stationary business was eminently successful.

While it may be argued that the success of a small business operating in a small town depended upon one's public relations, A. Oscar did not seem to have any time left to share with his family. Positions such as tax collector, constable, and town treasurer would have demanded a great deal of time, although they certainly were not full time vocations. Participation in fraternal organizations, committees, and boards of directors need not divide up one's time significantly, however, the combination of all of A. Oscar's activities, in addition to his running a thriving business must have meant he was worn thin at the end of each day. 
NOYES Amos "Oscar" (I13214)
 
15 Benjamin and Mary appear to have had at least two children, a son and a daughter born between 1820 and 1825.

Benjamin was listed as the head of family in the 30-40 age group on the 1830 Census in Dearborn County, Indiana. Included in the household were 1 female 30-40, presumably his wife Mary; 1 daughter 5-10; and 1 son 5-10.

Benjamin was listed as the head of family in the 40-50 age group on the 1840 Census in Dearborn County, Indiana. Included in the household were 1 female 20-30; and 1 male 15-20; presumably a daughter and son. His wife was not listed although she was still living. 
NOYES Benjamin (I20592)
 
16 Benjamin and Mary appear to have had at least two children, a son and a daughter born between 1820 and 1825.

Benjamin was listed as the head of family in the 30-40 age group on the 1830 Census in Dearborn County, Indiana. Included in the household were 1 female 30-40, presumably his wife Mary; 1 daughter 5-10; and 1 son 5-10.

Benjamin was listed as the head of family in the 40-50 age group on the 1840 Census in Dearborn County, Indiana. Included in the household were 1 female 20-30; and 1 male 15-20; presumably a daughter and son. His wife was not listed although she was still living. 
NOYES Benjamin (I3609)
 
17 Dorothea Noyes was listed in the household of Alfred J. Cotton in the 1820 Census at the age of 16-26. She was listed in the household of A. I. Cotton in the 1830 Census at the age of 30-40. Dorothea was listed in the household of A. J. Cotton in the 1840 Census at the age of 40-50. She was listed in the household of Alfred J. Cotton in the 1850 Census at the age of 54, born in Maine. Dorothea was listed in the household of A. J. Cotton in the 1860 Census at the age of 65, born in Maine. NOYES Dorothy Prince (I20579)
 
18 Dorothea Noyes was listed in the household of Alfred J. Cotton in the 1820 Census at the age of 16-26. She was listed in the household of A. I. Cotton in the 1830 Census at the age of 30-40. Dorothea was listed in the household of A. J. Cotton in the 1840 Census at the age of 40-50. She was listed in the household of Alfred J. Cotton in the 1850 Census at the age of 54, born in Maine. Dorothea was listed in the household of A. J. Cotton in the 1860 Census at the age of 65, born in Maine. NOYES Dorothy Prince (I3367)
 
19 Edward Davis, Esq., was for many years a very influential citi/,en of Oxford and much in public life ; captain of militia in time of the French War, and marched with thirty-three men of his company, for the relief of Fort William Henry, as far as Sheffield, Mass., and returned, having. been out sixteen days. He retained his connection with the militia and was from 1763 to 1771 major of the first Worcester Countv regiment, under Col. John Chandler, but was too far advanced in years to take an active part in the revolutionarv contest. From 1740 to 1780 he was constantly in town office ; fifteen years representative to the legislature, many years selectman, and moderator in town meetings. From 1760 onward, he was many years justice of the peace, doing much business, especially in performing the marriage ceremony; occupied positions of trust, and settled many estates. In 1772 he was the chairman of the town's committee to oppose the setting off of the town of Ward ; in 1775, member of the Provincial Congress at Watertown.
He settled i1f the easterly part of the town, on a farm given him by his father in 1740. Here he built a commodious and well finished house, which is still standing. Of the seven sons born and reared here, the youngest, Jonathan, only remained in town. He succeeded to the homestead and enlarged and much improved the house. The farm in 1872 passed out of the possession of the Davis family. Edward Davis, Esq., was an extensive land holder in Charlton and Dudley, as well as Oxford. 
DAVIS Edward, Esq. (I85103)
 
20 Feb. 6, 1755. WILLIAM STICKNEY of Newbury, shipwright, for £106, 13s. 4d., buys of his brother, John Stickney [84] of Newbury, merchant, all his right and title in a dwelling house and barn, and 25 poles of land in Newbury, fronting on King street. [Essex Deeds, 101: 103.]

He was on Grand Jury, Feb. 27, and March 9, 1768, and March 28, 1769.

Aug. 10, 1770. They had all their children (but William who had died, and John who was not then born) baptized, as appears by the records of St. Paul's Episcopal church, “at their own house.” He was a member of that church..

April 21, 1772. He buys, for £240, of John Jaques of Newbury, and Sarah, his wife, 18 acres of land in Newbury, it being three-fourths of the homestead on which he dwelt, with all the buildings thereon; the whole piece is 24 acres, and lies undivided between him and his brother, Samuel Jaques of Wilmington; is bounded on S. W. by road leading to Pearson's Mills, and N. W. partly on said Stickney's own land. [Ibid, 130: 48.]

May 18, 1773. He buys of Jonathan Ilsley of Newbury, for £100, a house and barn in Newbury, on or near “Merrimack Ridge”; bounded S. on said Stickney's land, W. on Dr. Joseph Morse, N. on Moses Stickney's. [Ibid, 140: 72.]

He made several other purchases, the last, Dec. 4, 1789.

May 2, 1786. He was chosen one of a committee in Newbury, to instruct their Representatives to General Court, to use their influence to procure the passage of an act at their next session, “that the holders of public securities receive no more for said securities than they cost them, and no more interest than 6 per ct. for what said securities cost them.” [Essex Journal of June 14, 1786.]

WILLIAM STICKNEY died in Newbury, September 28, 1790. [Gravestone.] Adm. on estate of WILLIAM STICKNEY, late of Newbury, yeoman, dec'd, was granted to his son William Stickney, May 30, 1791. [Essex Prob. 61: 148.]

Inv. of his estate, taken July 22, 1791. The homestead, including the buildings thereon, viz: One house and barn with 20 acres of tillage, and 18 of pasture land, £494; 35 acres of pasture land in High-field, £105; 28 rods of land in Newburyport, with dwelling house, store and barn thereon, £300; State notes, gun, library, cattle, farming tools, silver plate, &c. [Ibid, 61: 187.]

Guardianship of his son John, a minor, aged more than 18 years, granted to Welthen Stickney, July 25, 1791. [Ibid, 61: 187.]

Nov. 6, 1798. A committee was appointed, and Sept. 25, 1799, they set off to the widow, Mrs. Welthen Stickney, part of a dwelling house in Newburyport, on Federal street; 8 rods of land under and adjoining the same; 6 acres, 134 rods, in Home-field, and 35 acres in High-field pasture, in Newbury, remainder divided into three equal parts. No. 1, 24 rods of land, with part of house and barn in homestead, and 16 acres adjoining, valued at £1175. No. 2, 12 rods of land, with part of the house standing thereon, 16 acres bounded on highway. No. 3, 17 rods of land, with store and part of a dwelling house, bounded on Federal street.

No. 1 was set off to son Benjamin Stickney, he to pay his brother Moses his portion, and sister Jane part of her portion. No. 2, to son William Stickney, he to pay the legal representatives of his sister, Abigail Dodge, and brother John Stickney. No. 3, to Sarah Stickney, she to pay her sister Nancy Stickney her portion, and remainder of Jane's. [Ibid, 67: 63.]

Widow Wilthen Stickney died in Newburyport, Sept. 27, 1821, aged 90. Her Will, dated Jan. 6, 1808, proved Dec. 1821, recorded Essex Prob. 98: 275, gives to heirs of her daughter Abigail Dodge, to sons William and Benjamin Stickney, to three daughters, Sarah and Ann Stickney and Jane Clark, daughter Ann to be the executrix.

Adm. on her estate granted to her son-in-law, Robert Clark, Dec. 26, 1821, as executrix named in her Will had dec'd. [Ibid, 20: 31.]

In the house, on the estate WILLIAM STICKNEY bought of his brother John, in 1755, he resided till about 1772; it then continued to be occupied by his two sons-in-law, Thomas Dodge and Robert Clark, until the settlement of his estate, when in the division, it fell to his son William [289], whose son William [740], now (1868) occupies this estate, which is on Federal street, Newburyport.

In 1772 WILLIAM STICKNEY bought an estate in Newbury, where he removed and resided till his death; in the division it fell to his son, Gen. Benjamin Stickney, whose son and daughter still own and reside there (1868). 
STICKNEY William (I59010)
 
21 James Coffin was born July 9, 1664, on Nantucket Island. He was the first child of the Hon. James Coffin and Mary Severance.

The birth date of James is surrounded by controversy. Most records show his birth to be between 1667 and 1671, while his parents were living in Dover, New Hampshire. However, the Nantucket VR (P.R. 38) shows his birth as 09/05/1664.

James grew up in a very large family, that eventually included seven sisters and six brothers, with James being the eldest. Being of the second generation of settlers to the newly established colony, James was exposed to the hardships of developing the first farms on Nantucket. The sandy soil supported little in the way of crops. They brought sheep to the Island, in hopes of exporting the wool to the mainland in exchange for provisions needed to support their colony. Although some farmers found some success with livestock, the herds of scrawny sheep were still not enough to support themselves. During these first few years, about 1665, James' father decided to move the family off the Island, to Dover, New Hampshire where he had land holdings from earlier years, however, with the Indian uprisings during King Philip's War, in the 1670's, the Coffin's moved back on to Nantucket to stay. They returned during the years of development in the fishing industry. John Gardner had been commissioned to develop the fish trade, while the rest were trying their best to develop productive farms. Both Peter Folger and Tristram Coffyn, James' grandfather, were said to have had productive grist mills which indicates that there was some evidence of success with farming, however if the colony was to develop, more would have to be done.

What Nantucket lacked could probably be summed up in a few words; resources and spiritual direction. The initial goodwill was running thin. It was a time of squabbling between settlers. The full share holders were quarreling with the half share holders. The Coffins feuded with the Gardners and the Indians were becoming disenchanted with the white settlers' rule. Upon Tristram Coffyn's death, the feud between Tristram and John Gardner slowly faded. Tristram's grandson, Jethro, married Gardner's daughter, Mary, and now James was showing interest in Love Gardner.

In the late 1680's, James was the second Coffin to marry a Gardner. Love Gardner was born May 2, 1672 and was the daughter of Richard Gardner, one of the original settlers. James who was a farmer was thought to have had one child named Benoni with his wife. However, the child died in infancy. Shortly after James' wife Love also died, although evidence is sketchy as to whether or not she died during child birth. Soon thereafter, James courted Love's cousin, Ruth Gardner, daughter of John Gardner. On May 19, 1692, James and Ruth were married.

At about the time that James and Ruth were married, a group of Nantucket settlers atop of Folly House Hill were observing whales spouting a short distance off shore. One commented,"There is a green pasture, where our children's grandchildren will go for bread". This isn't the first time that the Islanders had taken notice of the abundance of whales off their shores, nor was it even the begining of the New England whale trade, for whales had been captured for over fifty years upon the coast of Long Island and Cape Cod. In the 1670's a whale was captured for the first time in Nantucket, and later on the Islanders took it upon themselves to hire a whaler named James Loper from Cape Cod, to come to the Island to teach the ways of whaling. Up to that time whaling on Nantucket consisted of waiting until a dead whale carcass washed up on shore. All the Islanders would rush for their claim including the Indians. Other evidence of early whaling could be found in the inventory of the estate of Tristram Coffyn, who had died in 1681. It showed 45 lbs. of whale bone, valued at 10d. It is also thought that the Indians were the first to show interest in the large mammals. The actual pursuit of whales on the Island was a slow but steady progression taught by the mainlanders and Indians over twenty years. They showed the settlers the ways in which a whale was to be approached to prevent the animal from getting frightened. Men such as Loper, showed how to extract the oil from the carcass, and where to thrust the harpoon. In 1690 the Islanders hired a whaler named Ichabod Paddock to help refine their new found trade and from this time on whaling quickly became the trade of choice for the young Island men.

It was no accident that the settlers took to whaling with such ease. The Colony could not survive without a profitable resource. Farming the sandy soil was not very productive, and their livestock were poor in quality. On the other hand their offshore location placed them close to migrating whales and their harbour at Shelburne offered good protection for their boats from bad weather.

In the beginning of shore whaling the Islanders divided the south shore of the Island into four equal parts, each consisting of three miles of shoreline. Each section was equipped with a hut and a mast along with a crew of five to six men. From the mast the signaller would spot the spray from a spouting whale and the chase would begin. The men would rush to the beach and launch their boats into the surf rowing with all their might. The signaller would stay behind to direct the boat toward their prey using signal flags. As the boat approached the whale the harpooner would drop his oars and ready himself for the kill. Once upon the whale the harpooner would thrust his harpoon into the animal for the capture, meanwhile the rowers would feverishly back paddle to escape any thrashing of the huge tail. Once the kill was completed they had the task of rowing the dead whale back to shore and land it on the beach. The whole hunt start to finish could take hours and needless to say the crew was exhausted by the end of the hunt. Once successfully on shore they would start cutting the whale blubber into cubes and then used a process called "trying out". This consisted of erecting large tripod kettle holders on the beach. They would set fires under the large kettles and boil the chunks of blubber down until the oil separated from the fibres. Then using large ladles they would scoop the oil into barrels and prepare it for shipment. Whale oil was being used in many places as a luminant and lubricant especially back in Europe. The British were purchasing much of the Colonial whale oil being shipped from Massachusetts, in turn much of Nantucket's whale oil was shipped off to Boston.

James and Ruth's first child, George, was born in 1693. In 1695 Sarah was born, followed by Nathan in 1696 and Elisha in 1699. During these years James was farming and taking care of livestock. The town meetings of March 19, 1707 recorded that "James Jr. was appointed to take account of all fleeces at ye time of sheering". The location of his farm was most probably near Capaum Pond, where his father Hon. James Coffin had property. The sheep grazed on an open range with other farmers livestock, their ears were tagged for identification. During the sheering, the atmosphere was festive and celebrated by most of the Islanders.

With regards to the ocean trades the Coffin, Gardner, Starbuck, Hussey, Macy and Paddock families were in the forefront of Nantucket's beginnings with fishing and whaling, James' brothers, Nathaniel, Jonathan and Ebenezer were active in the trade during the 1690's and into the 1700's. James is not on record as being involved as a mariner, but it is hard to believe that he was not, at least for part of the season, after all he was married to Captain John Gardner's daughter Ruth, whose family were all fishermen.

With the whale industry on the rise the town was gradually being shifted from Capaum Harbour to Shelburne. The whale stations along the south coastline were now giving way to whaling sloops anchored in Nantucket harbour. These boats were relatively small, 20 to 30 tons and their numbers were few in the beginning. They would apply their trade just off the Nantucket coast.

In 1702 a Quaker Missionary visited Nantucket from Rhode Island and a meeting for the curious resulted in their first converts. Mary Coffin Starbuck was the daughter of Tristram Coffyn and became one of the first Islanders to embrace Quakerism in 1704. This was significant not only because of her ties with two of the Islands leading families, the Coffins and the Starbucks, but also because of her valued opinion by all who knew her. Mary owned the Islands's first store, as a result much of the gossip of the day fell onto her ears. Mary, always seeing the good side helped to resolve family problems for the various patrons who came to her store, in turn she gained the settlers respect. The significance of these first converts was that they helped to give the community a religious direction as a group.
The Quaker faith was a left wing Puritan sect founded by George Fox in England in 1650. Fox believed that a Ministry was not necessary in order to spread the beliefs of the bible. Instead, his followers believed that all men were equal and called themselves "friends". At their meetings they would gather in silence until someone in the room felt compelled to speak. Their belief in such things as refusing to remove their hats and the refusal to wage war got them into trouble everywhere they went. Many were imprisoned or whipped and others were hung. The harsh Puritan rule of the Colonies made laws against those who helped the Quakers in any way. These same laws were what the Islanders were fleeing from when they first came to Nantucket fifty years earlier. Some had even helped the Quakers. So it is not hard to understand why the seeds of the Quaker faith took root in the soil of Nantucket. Most of the Islanders were already Christians of different faiths, mainly Baptists, but the Quaker belief in hard work and plain lifestyle seemed to be more suited to the settlers way of life on Nantucket. As mentioned earlier, what the Islanders lacked was resources and direction, now with the ever increasing whale industry turning profitable, along with their Quaker beliefs in hard work, the Island was beginning to pull away from the mainland's whale trade, in terms of productivity. It was recorded by many visitors that Nantucket was very different from the mainland regarding its flurry of activity and plain dress of its people. It was called a marriage of religion and commerce. In the early 1700's the writer, Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, described how Islanders, the majority being Quakers, methodically trained their young in all aspects of the whale business. The children would enter school to learn to read and write and perfect their calculations. Then at age twelve, they would apprentice in trades such as barrel making and at fourteen they would go off to sea. While working on the sloops, they would be taught the art of navigation, along with the steps involved in whaling start to finish. Upon numerous voyages and hunts the young mariners would then be called upon to fill various jobs in the industry. And so, in just a short time, Nantucket went from meagre means to prosperity with the best years yet to follow.

During these years in the early 1700's, James' father Hon. James Coffin was the Chief Magistrate on the Island. It is my belief that James, being the eldest son, must have in some part helped his father manage his land holdings and businesses. It's known that James Sr. had trading sloops going back and forth from the mainland. These sloops would have needed crews of up to ten men, depending on the size. Wool and whale oil would most likely have been the exports.

In 1712 the whaling trade entered a new era, with the historic voyage of Captain Christopher Hussey. Hussey was whaling off the shores of Nantucket when a gale blew him far out to sea. Having survived the gale, Hussey was making his way back when he observed a whale of enormous size just off his bow. With a good measure of courage, he attacked the whale and managed to be successful in killing the animal. The whale was not of the "scragg" or "right" species, but was a sperm whale. They found the oil to be of a much better quality, burning cleaner and brighter and so began not only the pursuit of sperm whales by Nantucket whalemen, but also sea ventures further off shore than ever before.

By 1715, Nantucket had six sloops engaged in the whale trade. Two of these vessels were owned by Coffins, the Nonsuch, 25 tons owned by James' brother Ebenezer and the Speedwell, 25 tons owned by James' son George. Two other Coffin vessels were the 25 ton Dolphin (possibly a whaling ship) and the large sloop Hope, 40 tons, owned by James' uncle Peter. The Hope was a trading vessel.

By the 1720's James' sons George, Nathan, Elisha and Joshua were all part of the whale trade along with his brothers Ebenezer and Jonathan. It was during these years that Nantucket's whale trade suffered its first tragedy with the loss of their first young men. On April 27, 1722, James and Ruth suffered the loss of their sons Elisha and Joshua. Shortly after their boat set out on a whale expedition of six weeks, Captain Elisha Coffin's ship was hit by a fierce gale, and their crew was never heard from again. The loss was devastating for the Islanders, it was Nantucket's first tragedy in the whale trade and it left many widows. Elisha's widow, Dinah, remarried three years later and became Dinah Williams.

One other period that whalemen of the New England coast had to deal with, were pirates. Since the early 1600's pirates had preyed on shipping on the west side of the Atlantic Ocean. Most pirates were unemployed seamen and ex-navy sailors, who between wars found themselves with little to do with their time. During wars, countries would hire them to attack the enemy, but most times they would wreak havoc on any easy target. Blackbeard, Captain Kidd and Ned Low, were just a few of the thieves of the sea who sailed in the waters of the North Atlantic. Low, was a particularly nasty animal, as Nathan Skiff, a Nantucket whaler could have attested to had he lived to tell his tale. In June of 1723, Skiff was in pursuit of whales about eighty miles off Nantucket, when Ned Low's ship spotted Skiff's sloop. Low, who was described by his own crew as a maniac and brute, immediately chased down the whaling ship. Luckily for some of the whaling crew they were out in their small whale boats when the attack occurred and managed to escape to a distant ship. Captain Skiff was not so fortunate. Low ordered Skiff stripped and proceeded to whip the young Captain around the deck of the boat with a belt. Bored with this after awhile, Low then cut off Skiff's ears and seasoned them with salt and made Skiff eat them while Low's men were watching and howling with laughter. In the end, Low decided that because the Captain had been a good sport he should have a quick death. Skiff was shot in the head and his boat was sunk. The remaining crew were set adrift in a small boat with no water or food and left to perish. Little did Ned Low realize that the Nantucket boys were taught the art of navigation and shortly after the Pirate ship was out of sight and they simple returned to the Island. A few months later Low's men turned on him and set him adrift. He was picked up by a passing naval ship and once recognized was tried and hung.

James and Ruth had eleven children in all. Their last born was Benjamin born in 1718, Ruth was in her mid forties and James would have been in his late fifties. Whether James embraced the Quaker faith is a question requiring more research, however, most of his children seem to have had connections to it. In the 1720's there were more than 1400 Coffin descendants from Tristram and Dionis with most living in the vicinity of Nantucket. Therefore, the records of who was who becomes somewhat confusing. Their given names give some clue as to their faith. Names such as Elisha, Rebeka, Seth and Uriah, are most certainly biblical names and most probably Quaker names, but it is hard to say what faith they were for sure.

The 1720's and 1730's saw Nantucket prosper with every year. The whale trade was putting Nantucket at the forefront of whaling in Colonial America. By 1730, Nantucket had a fleet of 25 whaling boats varying in size from 30 to 50 tons. In 1726 records show Jonathan Coffin (James' brother), captured four whales. James' son George captured one and Bartlett captured four. In all 86 whales were captured by Nantucket boats. Soon Nantucket could no longer supply the men needed to crew the boats and they recruited whalers from New York and Cape Cod. The prosperity continued on during the last years of James' life. James Coffin died August 2, 1741 on the Island. His wife Ruth died in Nantucket in 1748. His will was probated on November 6, 1741. 
COFFIN James (I25647)
 
22 Per History of Pownal, Maine, Israel was included in a list of surveyors, field-drivers, and hog-reeves in 1808.

Israel sold his property in Cumberland County to accompany his favorite minister, Rev. Daniel Plummer, to the Far West in the fall of 1817. Together with 14 other families, a total of 78 people, they traveled through Portland, Haverhill, Albany, up the valley of the Mohawk, across to Olean Point on the headwaters of the Allegheny River, down the Allegheny by boats and rafts to Pittsburgh, then down the Ohio to Lawrenceburg, Indiana where most of them located on Greenbriar Ridge, now known as the village of Manchester. Israel settled near "Mule Town" about 11 miles from Lawrenceburg on the Indianapolis State Road.

The move was apparently due to the extreme cold and widespread crop failures in 1816, the year of "eighteen hundred and froze to death" which resulted from the world-wide dust cloud following the explosion of Mt. Tambara in Indonesia.

Before he left Maine, Israel was thrown from a horse which trod on his forehead and smashed his skull in just over the eye. He was taken up for a corpse, many pieces of bone were taken out, and he carried the scar into his grave.

Per Indiana Land Entries, Cincinnati District, 1801-1840, Israel participated in the following land transactions in Dearborn County T6N, R2W of 1st PM on 26 Dec 1817:

- Filed for purchase of NE 1/4 Sec 17. Relinquished.

- Purchased SE 1/4 Sec 17

- Purchased NE 1/4 Sec 20. Relinquished W 1/2 to George Clark, 18 March 1830. Vol. II, p.87, shows a final certificate #142 for the entire NE 1/4 to Israel Noyes. 
NOYES Israel (I6825)
 
23



The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II says Charles J.; residence Brunswick; Co. A, 11th Regt.
Wheeler: Noyes, Charles J.; Corp.; 11th Regt., A Co; enlisted Nov. 7, 1861; discharged for disability 1862; reenlisted sergt 25th, Co D; mustered out July 10, 1863. 
NOYES Charles Jeffreds (I7004)
 
24 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I51458)
 
25

(11 : 4m : 1661.) 
PLATTS James (I46512)
 
26

(Ae. 84y 9m.) 
THOITS Prudence (I52850)
 
27

(Old Burial Ground AKA Old Atkinson Cemetery.) 
FRENCH Ida S. (I16459)
 
28

(She may be the Sarah Couchman who sailed for New England in 1635 on the "Hercules" of Sandwich [NEHGR 75:218; GM 2:2:217-18].) 
CUSHMAN Sarah (I10103)
 
29

Harmon was a clerk in 1880 in a store in Clear Creek Co., Silver Spring s, CO, then in 1910 was a bookkeeper in a grocery store in Silver Plume Pc t., Clear Creek Co., CO., 1880 and 1910 Census' 
NOYES Harmon H. (I56566)
 
30

"On 27 Dec 1782 William was bequeathed 7 acres of York land "next to Deborah's land" by his maternal grandfather William Dunning. William later sold this parcel to Samuel Baker Fairfax husbandman 7 Jun 1810 for $75 when William was styled "of a place called Amos Town (Ames Town) in the County of Summersett(Somerset)". Ames Town was the former name of Sangerville, which was also known as "Number Four, Sixth Range". Samuel Baker was married to Deborah Farnum (Zebedian, Daniel, Ralph3, Ralph2,Ralph1st, Henry) who was Williams' 2nd cousin. Their respective grandfather's Ralph(4) and Daniel(4) Farnum were brothers and progenitors of the Farnums in Maine. The property in York was descrbed as on the road leading from "Sewall's Bridge so called to Portmouth Ferry" and was bounded by land of "David & Timothy Baker and nearly opposite to dwelling house of said Farnham's mothers.... being the same land.... given William Farnham, by William Dunning of York deceased". Witnesses were Henry and Ralph Baker to the deed signed by William and Hannah. A week later William deposed before Abrm Burrell, JP at Kennebeck 13 Jun 1810 (but not Hannah) that the instrument was his own and free act and deed [Rec: 23 Jun 1810]
9 children of William and Hannah Farnum.
Betsey, William Jr., Stillman, Jotham, Samuel,Benjamin, Mary V, Levi, Oliver
============================================= 
FARNHAM William (I22577)
 
31

A soldier, called out under Capt Thomas NOYES, for the Indian attack on Haverhill, Aug 29 1708. Will dated May 13 1727. Gravestone gives: Mr. JOHN STICKNEY died Aug 13 1727 in his 62d year. Buried in Old Town Cemetery, Newbury. 
STICKNEY John (I1672)
 
32

After living some time in Falmouth, Ebenezer and Mary moved to Middleborough about 1745. In a deed made in 1749, he is called "Ebenezer Cobb of Middleborough, housewright," but must have returned to Maine by 1750 because on 8 November 1750, Ebenezer Cobb of Falmouth, housewright, was appointed by the court as the guardian of his nieces and nephews, the children of his sister, Hannah, named as Anna, John, Benjamin, and Sarah Swett, "minors under 14 & children of John Swett, late of Falmouth, deceased, to act on their behalf during their minorities." [Frost, Maine Probate Abstracts 8/119, 191 (John Swett)]

On 19 December 1761, Ebenezer Cobb of Falmouth, housewright, for £13-6-8 paid by his son, Smith Cobb of Falmouth, housewright, conveyed to him the westerly half of a small lot of land in Falmouth "called the Neck," which Ebenezer had bought from his father, Samuel Cobb of Falmouth, housewright, which "deed dated 4 February 1754 [shows that] I am lawfully seized and possessed of the same in my own proper right as a good, perfect and absolute Estate of Inheritance in fee simple." [Cum Co Deeds 1:392-3]

On 12 August 1770, Ebenezer Cobb of Falmouth, housewright, for £72 lawful money paid by [his sons] Smith Cobb and Jedediah Cobb of Falmouth, housewrights "(without any advantage to be taken by survivorship)," sold them 30 acres of land in Falmouth "being the same I bought from my brother, Chipman Cobb, by his deed dated 16 September 1749, recorded in York records, Lib. 3 Fol. 301." Witnesses were John Erving, Jr. and Enoch Freeman. This deed was acknowledged and recorded the same day. [Cum Co Deeds 5:302]

On 27 February 1788, Ebenezer Cobb, now called "of Portland," housewright, sold to his son, Smith Cobb of Portland, housewright, for £80, "the western moiety or half-part of a lot of land in Portland ... together with the westerly end of the dwelling house thereon standing wherein I now live, the other end or half of said house & moiety of lot being owned by Samuel Freeman, Esq., who purchased the same from my son, Jedediah. Witnesses were Samuel Freeman and Mary Toby. The deed was acknowledged and recorded the same day. [Cumb Co Deeds 19:188-89. 
COBB Ebenezer (I1625)
 
33

As in the case of Benjamin's brother Joseph, Cutting Noyes, the trustee appointed by their father, and Mary Noyes, their mother, conveyed to Benjamin on May 1, 1716, certain lots of marsh, upland, pasture and woodland in Newbury. Some of his land Benjamin sold to Samuel Moody, John Kelly (two acres and a house), William Ilsley and John Rolfe, 1717-1723/4. He bought from William Moody two acres in 1715 and seven acres of the inherited pasture from his brother Joseph in 1721. On February 22, 1720/1, Nathaniel Dummer and Sarah his wife "(formerly Sarah Moody)" sold for £300 to their uncle Benjamin Lunt one-half of a certain tenement of housing and lands in Newbury, vizt. "one half of the Land and Orchard called ye Homestead and ye buildings thereon," and various small tracts. In a deed of 1723 Benjamin conveyed to "my brothers-in-law Joseph Knight, Junr., Joseph Noyes and Nathan Noyes." By his final deed January 5, 1748/9, Benjamin "for the love I bear to my son Ephraim" conveyed to Ephraim half of the housing and land that he had in Newbury. 
LUNT Benjamin (I23323)
 
34

Benjamin Lake of North Yarmouth, Maine may be identical with the sixth child and fourth son of Thomas Lake of Dartmouth, Massachusetts. (Some accounts of Thomas Lake's family claim that his son Benjamin died unmarried. 
LAKE Benjamin (I10093)
 
35

Came to Paris in 1800, and was indentured with his brother Uriah, until he was twenty-one. He was b. Sept. 8, 1786, and therefore his term of service was seven years. He died in Paris, Sept. 5, 1842, aged 56. His wife d. May 13, 1849, aged 52 years. 
RIPLEY Ransom (I17418)
 
36

Children born in Falmouth and Portland, Maine. 
NOYES James (I19399)
 
37

Deaf mute.

In 1829 there is a Report on the petition of Jane Titcomb to send Nancy and Sophronia Titcomb to the American Asylum. 
TITCOMB Nancy (I36761)
 
38

Deaf mute. 
POORE John (I36760)
 
39

Died in infancy. 
SEABURY Annie Belle (I11380)
 
40

Died young. 
EYRE Catherine (I4139)
 
41

Farm on Cousin's Island, 1815. 
PETTINGELL Samuel (I24343)
 
42

Goold: Built the Charles Jones home, a fine brick house on Free Street.

Rowe: Administered the estate of his father Joseph, in 1801 selling a large tract of land in Falmouth near Saccarappa for $800 to William and Solomon Babb. 
NOYES Jacob (I43161)
 
43

Had three children. 
LORING Hannah (I33698)
 
44

Had three children. 
LORING Hannah (I94708)
 
45

Had two sons and two daughters. 
LORING Selah "Celia" (I14666)
 
46

Had two sons and two daughters. 
LORING Selah "Celia" (I103173)
 
47

He and his wife Mary Oliver were, through Isaac and Oliver Appleton, the progenetors of the well known publishers, D. Appleton & Co., of Boston and New York. The Appletons' have a Coat of Arms as follows: "Argent, a fess sable between three apples Gules, leaved and stalked Vert." 
Hon. APPLETON Samuel (I47120)
 
48

He bought a farm and settled in Berwick Me., Lived at Kittery, Me., Moved to Wells, Me. and bought a farm in 1750 in the section called Tatnic. On April 13, 1767 he deeded farm and property to son John for the support of himself and wife Deborah during their lives. (York Deeds.) 
WEBBER Edmund (I19159)
 
49

He bought a farm and settled in Berwick Me., Lived at Kittery, Me., Moved to Wells, Me. and bought a farm in 1750 in the section called Tatnic. On April 13, 1767 he deeded farm and property to son John for the support of himself and wife Deborah during their lives. (York Deeds.) 
WEBBER Edmund (I51992)
 
50

He bought a farm and settled in Berwick Me., Lived at Kittery, Me., Moved to Wells, Me. and bought a farm in 1750 in the section called Tatnic. On April 13, 1767 he deeded farm and property to son John for the support of himself and wife Deborah during their lives. (York Deeds.) 
WEBBER Edmund (I2848)
 

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